Wind Power Generation

Reducing Curtailment of Wind Energy

Wind power generation is characterized by its anti-peak nature due to day/night changes of natural wind. At night when wind is stronger, the amount of wind power integrated into the power grid is larger though energy demands at that time is at low points. The peak load of power grid is now dominantly regulated by thermal power generating units with high coal consumption, indicating a low load tracing capacity.

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Smooth Output

Changes of wind speed and direction within a short period of time may exert great impacts on the energy supply quality to the power grid. To balance the instability of power output from the wind farm, thermal and hydro-power generating units are usually employed to strengthen its rapid response and frequency regulation capability to ensure its safe and stable operations.

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Power Prediction

Natural wind is greatly affected by day/night, climatic and seasonal factors and can change abruptly and randomly. It is unfavorable for the scheduling of generation plans and real time dispatching. To ensure safe and stable operations, the capacity of wind power transmitted to the power grid is therefore restricted.

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Reactive Compensation

A wind power generator needs to absorb or consume reactive power during operation and upon integration to the power grid, a change in the reactive power may be noticeable. This consequently leads to lower stability of grid voltage, poor grid conditions or even grid breakdown. Therefore, it is necessary to provide dynamic reactive compensation for the wind farms to improve their reactive conditions and the voltage level at the integration point. This is crucial to maintain stable operations of the power grid.

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Low Voltage Ride Through (LVRT)

Any faults or disturbances at the power grid may result in voltage dip at the integration point with a wind farm and in serious cases, this may lead the power grid to break down. Therefore, a wind farm must have certain LVRT capacity, i.e. the wind power generating unit must be able to operate continuously without going offline within certain range of voltage dip and timescale.

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